MVP Disc Golf Putters

MVP Disc Golf Putters - Precision Disc Golf

MVP Disc Golf Putters

Hey there Precisioners! 

We are excited to be back in producing content at regular intervals again moving into 2019!  

I’ll start this year out with a bit that helps people learn a brand that many players only know at a topical level, MVP & Axiom discs (Streamline is their single mold brand, but as they come out with more molds and I have more experience I’ll cover that).

As my bag is currently all GYRO, I have spent almost a full season with their discs, and can help answer the most common questions people have when trying to explore their curiosity with this GYRO technology. We will start with the discs that are used the most in every round: Putters.

I will be talking about the discs I currently bag, and have thrown, however for the purposes of this article we will be looking at tee shots and approaches, not putting. The reason I don’t want to give opinion on putting putters is that I believe the most important part of choosing a putter is how it feels in the hand. Choosing a stability that suits your putting style is second most important, but for most people, finding a disc they feel comfortable holding and putting with, is the most important factor.

MVP Discs Putter: Axiom Envy

The first disc I want to talk about is the Axiom Envy. The Envy is likely the disc most of the people in my circle know about in the MVP/Axiom lineup. The flight numbers are 3/3/0/2, and in full disclosure I don’t put a lot of stock in flight numbers. I currently bag five of the Envy, and have also found that they have enough distance potential where I no longer bag any midrange discs. The Envy has great stability for strong backhand throws, and I use mine for shots all the way up to 350 feet! I use the Envy for tee shots, approaches, and putting. In the summer, I putt with the Electron firm plastic (very stiff) because I like a stiff baseline plastic feel putter. However, in the winter, I putt with both the Electron, and the Electron soft plastic (today it’s 8 degrees Fahrenheit in Minnesota, so the disc feels markedly harder than in warmer temperatures). My usual summer lineup looks like this:

  • 1x Neturon soft Envy. This is one of the most reliably overstable plastic types for this mold. For hyzer and wind shots.

  • 2x Electron Envy. Usually 1 nearly brand new and still fresh for very straight hyzer flip shots, and 1 pretty beat up for my turnover or understable putter needs.

  • 1x Electron firm Envy. For putting (in the winter this changes to Electron soft).

  • 1x Glow Eclipse Envy. The least glide and most overstable Envy I have is in this plastic. It’s the closest disc in the MVP/Axiom lineup to a Zone.

Aaron Palm with an Axiom Envy ace on hole 6 at Blue Ribbon Pines in East Bethel, MN.

Aaron Palm with an Axiom Envy ace on hole 6 at Blue Ribbon Pines in East Bethel, MN.

MVP Discs Putter: Proxy

The only other putter in Axiom’s lineup is the Proxy. The Proxy is rated 3/3/-1/.05, and as you can guess has a subtle understability, and reliable very slight fade. I have thrown a number of Proxys and they are really straight! The function of the Proxy that I’ve thrown is very similar to what I used a very beat up Envy for, so for a player looking to throw a forgiving very straight throwing putter, look no further than the Proxy. If I wasn’t working on being more of a mold minimalist, this disc would be in my bag.

MVP Discs Putter: Ion

Moving onto MVP putters the disc I see most is the Ion. The Ion is rated 2.5/3/0/1.5. The Ion is most often used for putting (I have a buddy who is a lights out putter with them!), but off the tee they have a really nice blend of stability and low speed. Again, as a putter mold minimalist I don’t bag one, however they are really reliable approach discs, and are stable neutral in all the right ways. If you’re looking for a beaded stable putter, this could be your next bread and butter!

MVP Discs Putter: Atom

The next most common MVP putter I see is the Atom. The Atom is rated 3/3/0/1. The Atom is the first MVP disc I ever bought. I prefer baseline plastic for putters and midranges, so I got to know the Electron Atom quite well. It is probably the straightest putter I have ever thrown off the tee. The distance potential is enormous for a putter, the glide number to me should be a 5 not a 3. The Atom can be thrown easily 325 feet for me perfectly straight, with only medium power. If I didn’t prefer the feeling of the Envy in the hand, I would bag at least 4-5 Atoms. Although Electron Atoms are very neutral in flight out of the box, they do beat in to relatively understable over time. This is a common occurrence with baseline plastic - no fault of the mold or plastic! I will say that the Proton Atoms I have thrown are significantly more overstable in flight, and the Neutron plastic Atoms are stable as well. A great mold, and one I would recommend to players of all skill levels.

MVP Discs Putter: Anode

A mold that I’ve noticed a number of the MVP team members putting with is Anode.  The Anode is rated 2.5/3/0/.5. The Anode is beadless, and is a very straight flyer off the tee. I find it to be a reliable hyzer flip to flat thrower at medium high power. It feels great in the hand. If you are looking to try a straight flyer and putter give this a try!

Aaron Palm with an Anode ace on hole 14 at Acorn Disc Golf Park in Roseville, MN.

Aaron Palm with an Anode ace on hole 14 at Acorn Disc Golf Park in Roseville, MN.

MVP Discs Putter: Spin

The Spin is the understable putter in the GYRO line up. The Spin is rated 2.5/4/-2/0. I have thrown the Spin in Proton and Electron plastic. In both plastics, the Spin flies very true to the numbers. It is a great understable utility disc for this spot. I used to love throwing PA4’s when I threw a lot of Prodigy plastic, and the Spin is a perfect replacement.


MVP Discs Putter: Particle

The Particle is the most overstable disc in the MVP/Axiom lineup. The Particle is rated 3/3/0/2.5. Currently, the Particle is only available in Neutron and Neutron soft plastic. As I’ve said above, I generally prefer baseline plastic for my putters and mids, however this mold feels so good in the hand it was easy to overlook. Though the Particle is supposed to be more stable than the Envy, I truthfully found them to be almost identical, though perhaps the Particle has a touch less glide. I think it is an outstanding mold, and if you are looking for the overstable putter between MVP/Axiom, I would try both and see what feels better to you.

All in all, there is a GYRO putter mold for everyone. A common request is for an overstable putter, similar to a Discraft Zone or an Innova Gator. In the next article, I’ll cover the MVP midrange that most closely aligns with that style.

If you haven’t tried anything from MVP/Axiom, they have an outstanding line of molds, and plastic blends. It would be worth your time to give them a toss. I will say, with utmost certainty, that the longest flying putters I have thrown are all GYRO. The molds are very true and straight flying discs for almost any speed arm, and I am thrilled with my putter game off the tee, thanks to the Axiom Envy.  

Thanks for reading, and I look forward to a great 2019.

See you on the course,

Aaron

Two Things to Avoid When Preparing to Play in a Disc Golf Tournament

Preparing for a Disc Golf Tournament

Today, I would like to talk about how my recent experiences in preparing and playing have gone for tournaments. The last two tournaments I have played in have been some of the worst disc golf I’ve played in years.

After having some time to reflect on this, I believe it is a combination of a few things, so let me speculate why this is and how I plan to prepare differently to receive a different result in the future.

As we all know, actually following advice, especially regarding the mental game, is tremendously difficult when you feel the pressure to perform. I believe that there are 2 main components to this and we will discuss them separately.   

1. Not sticking to a single type of practice.

The first issue is how I tried to prepare for the tournament. I put in more rounds of practice than I had ever before any tournament at the courses.

Usually this would be a good thing, however I played 4 of the leagues at one of the courses and won 2 of the 4 weeks! How could this be bad?

Well, as I suspect many of us (especially amateurs) do, we start to compare all future rounds to our better, or best rounds at a course in the past.

Though I have traditionally played very well competitively at both courses in leagues and single round tournaments, I managed to shoot the worst rounds imaginable in the one tournament this year I have played and wanted really badly to do well.

In preparing for the tournament, I didn’t stick to a single type of practice.

I practiced inconsistent methods, and I created a lack of confidence in a single method.

What I mean by this is, every round I tried to play slightly more aggressive than the last and both physically and psychologically it had a negative impact on my performance when it really mattered.

Instead of playing my game (which is semi reminiscent of “old man disc golf”) and staying in the fairway and trusting my putting, I wanted to be a hero off the tee on every hole.

This is a tough spiral once you start making bad shots. For one, if you try to throw harder than you really can or should, you tend to miss release points, landing zones, and angle of release.

Beyond that the confidence to throw the more technical holes is greatly diminished and the ability to comfortably throw tighter lanes seems harder than it should. After this cycle starts, you end up having to make longer putts than you’re used to and once you miss those putts, the confidence in that part of the game starts to diminish as well.

With that being said, I put myself in a position to fail. I bring this all back to trying to play a game that really wasn’t mine. I truly believe that if I had just played a comfortable game hitting fairways and giving myself a chance to putt in all of my practice rounds, I would’ve been just fine.

Hindsight is 20/20 as they say, so for next time, I will practice playing my game and leave myself a chance to stay in contention and make a push in the final round. Also, don’t practice a course you know super well, to the point where you start to make up new throws, lines, and get creative for shots that are neither needed, nor advisable.

2. Not playing your OWN game.

The second issue is playing the tournament itself. I went in with the mindset that I would play safe.

This generally good advice, except when you’ve been practicing playing aggressive. I found that the far throws were executed poorly and the short throws were either too short or too long. I had lost my comfortable throws in simply trusting my muscle memory to do the work for me. Instead of doing what I do best, I tried to “throw through the slump”.

Boy oh boy, is that a poor choice.

Generally if I’m having trouble finding a rhythm, I disc down to less stable discs and find a way to hyzer flip to flat.

However, instead of doing the smart thing, I started throwing more stable discs harder. As I’m sure everyone knows, throwing harder is the solution to nothing when you’re having a bad day hitting your lines. In putting, I decided I would putt more aggressively to make up for my lack of accuracy on the tee pads and approaches, but as you would guess the numbers long-term don’t end up favoring that decision making.

The discs didn’t fail me, I failed me.

The real villain here was expectations.

I expected myself to be competing for first or second place and was almost embarrassed to think I would finish any lower.

The truth is: in any field you’re really playing against yourself.

Of course, in the last round if you’re chasing for the win you have to play according to your ability to gain strokes on a player, but many times in my experience unless you’re down to just a few holes, it's best to play your game.

Most of the time especially at the amateur level, mistakes will be made. This is mostly true in tournaments that are multi-day and at least 3 rounds, but I think playing your own game at the amateur level will generally yield the best results. This last tournament, I ignored all of the advice I give others and try to heed myself.

So after taking a few days off from throwing, I decided to go into the next league round and play my game. Low and behold: I threw great!

Such a mixed blessing. It is always frustrating to not throw to your potential in big situations, but part of nerves is good decision making.

The best practice to get better under pressure, is to play in situations where you tend to perform poorly.

I have made it a priority that when I play rounds I want to do especially well in that I will keep an extra scorecard and record every poor decision I make. In many situations, awareness at the time is most of the battle.    

If there is another takeaway to have in competition I believe it is that you need to play in a bit of a bubble. Watching both Paul McBeth and Ricky Wysocki play live, especially this year, they will be socially polite during a round, however they tend to play as if they are the only one on the course.

They seem quiet, focused, and uninterested in anything but their next throw.

Striving to make that a part of at least one round with friends may be a fun challenge. I’m going to try to see if I can still be fun to play with and polite, but focused in my casual rounds. The good news is that my friends will let me know if I’m being too distant. It will be a good test.

Hopefully some of you out there can relate, learn from my mistakes, and have found some takeaways for your own game here today.

Thank you for taking the time to join me in the reflection of my awful tournament play, and please share your experiences and thoughts!

See you on the course,

Aaron